• OVERVIEW
  • Genesis
  • The NWWA Logo
  • NWWA Mission
  • AIMS
  • ORG Structure

OVERVIEW


The Navy Wives Welfare Association (NWWA) is an Association of wives of the Indian Navy personnel. It is a registered society; under Society Registration Act XXI of 1860 vide certificate number 3224 issued on 27th January 1967 as Naval Officers Wives Association and name amended as NWWA, on 14th February 1986. NWWA supplements the efforts of the Indian Navy in areas of community welfare and development, particularly with regard to the families. The Navy extends the needed encouragement and support for the programmes as it lays a great emphasis in the well-being of the families. NWWA operates on an all India basis and is headed by the wife of the Chief of the Naval Staff based at New Delhi. The wives of the three Commanders-in-Chief at Mumbai, Visakhapatnam and Kochi, monitor and coordinate NWWA activities, within the respective Commands and are designated as Regional Presidents. The range of programmes of the Association cover most areas of concern for the woman of today, from home & children to jobs and careers. There is no contradiction between women who have opted for professional work and those who have stayed at 'home' - each one has a very vital role to play in all aspects of life of the community and society.

Genesis


At the time of Independence the Navy wives were a part of Armed Forces Women’s Welfare Organization, a combined body of Defence wives mainly operating from Delhi with each service holding the president-ship by turn – a legacy from colonial times. The charter of duties of this Organization included visiting hospitals, taking care of widows, rolling bandages, attending signals and plotting classes. Although the work was challenging and generated a lot of enthusiasm amongst the ladies, it did not provide for interaction with the community at the grass-root level. Naval Officers Wives Association (NOWA) The seed of Navy Wives Organization was sown in Mumbai in 1948 when Mrs Manek Soman, invited some ladies and proposed formation of an organized welfare body to help sailors and their families who were struggling with diverse problems in the post independence era. Mrs Betty David was elected President of this informal set up at the first meeting of the members in the Naval Officers Mess, Vasant Sagar, Mumbai. The formation of Naval Officers Wives Association (NOWA), in 1949 under the leadership of Lady Parry, was therefore a natural evolutionary process. A constitution was drafted and the Association got off to a start at Delhi, Bombay, Cochin, Visakhapatnam and Jamnagar.

Navy Wives Welfare Association (NWWA)
The Association continued to grow and evolve ever since with increasing involvement and influence over issues of community needs. Many of the loan schemes prevalent in service today can be traced back to NOWA. The first family clinics opened as NOWA Clinics. KG schools have been NOWA/NWWA 'babies', as are today’s play schools ‘Little Angels’. Plans for the care of the Navy widows and challenged children have all sprung from sensitive and caring women. In the year 1985, Mrs Meera Tahiliani, the then President, took the initiative and set in motion, events which led to the change over from NOWA to Navy Wives Welfare Association (NWWA). The evolution from NOWA to NWWA marked a significant stage in the process of democratization of the Association. Sailors' wives were integrated with equal rights of membership.

New Organization – a metamorphosis
The new organization consequently began to exert its own pressures leading to better appreciation of community needs. This led to the second major development, which was initiated in 1991, by Mrs Lalita Ramdas, when the organization became truly professional with multifaceted welfare and development programmes. The new organization of the Association has now been in place for many years meeting community needs directly through its programmes and projecting larger issues to the Navy for necessary action as an authentic opinion survey agency. Mrs Binu Shekhawat, who took over from Mrs Ramdas, provided the needed steadying hand consolidating the rapid progress. She worked tirelessly to democratize NWWA in spirit removing rank consciousness. During her stewardship the Regions (Commands) were given greater autonomy and NWWA Units were set free to devise their own programmes to suit local needs within the extensive NWWA charter. In 2000, Northern Region was merged with NWWA Central and the post of President-in-Chief was renamed as President NWWA. President NWWA (NR) was made the Vice-President, NWWA.

The NWWA Logo


The new NWWA Logo exemplifies the strength of unity which is the fulcrum that nurtures harmonious co-existence of Naval Ladies through selfless service to the Naval community. The changing face of modern society necessitates reaching out to all and forging strong bonds within this big Naval family. The four symbolic ladies representing each region are seen emerging from the ocean, holding hands in unison ever so strong and victorious, against all odds. The waves depict sea-going nature of their husband's job and challenges it brings along. The anchor depicts the stability which a Naval wife provides to her better half and keeps him rooted at all times. The anchor has a ' W ' entwined in it, depicting “Women” and all the associated virtues of women in being the wind beneath the wings of their husbands. The phrase 'Reaching out' … adages the much needed rallying point for the society today. We need to foster the spirit of reaching out – to your neighbor, to your community, to the Navy and finally, to your country. The new logo has the colors Red, Orange, Blue and White incorporated to symbolize the tributes of Strength, vision, valour, courage, trust and peace.

NWWA Mission


“Great Oaks from acorns grow”, aptly describes the growth of Navy Wives Welfare Association (NWWA), from an informal group of ladies to what it is today. While the men in white brave the high seas, soar through the skies or prowl the dark, silent depths of the ocean, their families are assured of support and care from NWWA. Being a voluntary organization NWWA follows an ‘open door’ policy for active participation by members, at any stage, in any of its programmes.

Its activities include:
• Women Empowerment
• Community Support
• Education
• Health
• Social Welfare
• Environment

AIMS


•   Keeping wives of all navy personnel in touch for their mutual help and benefit
•   Carrying on developmental programmes in times of peace
•   Providing comfort and all possible help in times of war
•   Rehabilitating widows and families of deceased navy personnel
•   Facilitating development of academic and vocational skills
•   Implementing programmes for community development
•   Relieving hardships of people affected by natural disasters

NWWA unstintingly works towards achieving visualized objectives. This organization is constantly changing its programmes, keeping in mind the growing needs of the community and changing concepts of welfare. NWWA aims to empower all its members not only with professional prowess but also financial independence and entrepreneurial skills to initiate new ventures or get suitable employment. NWWA provides a platform to ladies to “learn and earn” through its various hobby and professional classes.

ORG STRUCTURE

Mrs.Reena Lanba
PRESIDENT NWWA
presidentnwwa.1@gmail.com
Mrs.Geetha Ashok
VICE PRESIDENT NWWA
vicepresidentnwwa@gmail.com
Mrs Preeti Luthra
PRESIDENT NWWA
Western Region
presidentnwwa.wr@gmail.com
OUTLYING UNITS
BANGALORE
GOA
JABALPUR
KARANJA
KARWAR
MANKHURD
OKHA
PORBANDAR
GHATKOPAR
Mrs Meena Pawar
OFFICIATING PRESIDENT NWWA
Eastern Region
presidentnwwa.er@gmail.com OUTLYING UNITS
CHENNAI
HYDERABAD
KALINGA
KALPAKKAM
KATTABOMMAN
KOLKATA
RAJALI
PURUNDU
Mrs Sapana Chawla
PRESIDENT NWWA
Southern Region
presidentnwwa.sr@gmail.com OUTLYING UNITS
AGRANI
CHILKA
DRONACHARYA
EZHIMALA
MANDOVI
SHIVAJI
VALSURA
HAMLA
Mrs Seema Verma
PRESIDENT NWWA
A   &   N Region
presidentnwwa.an@gmail.com

Genesis


At the time of Independence the Navy wives were a part of Armed Forces Women’s Welfare Organization, a combined body of Defence wives mainly operating from Delhi with each service holding the president-ship by turn – a legacy from colonial times. The charter of duties of this Organization included visiting hospitals, taking care of widows, rolling bandages, attending signals and plotting classes. Although the work was challenging and generated a lot of enthusiasm amongst the ladies, it did not provide for interaction with the community at the grass-root level. Naval Officers Wives Association (NOWA) The seed of Navy Wives Organization was sown in Mumbai in 1948 when Mrs Manek Soman, invited some ladies and proposed formation of an organized welfare body to help sailors and their families who were struggling with diverse problems in the post independence era. Mrs Betty David was elected President of this informal set up at the first meeting of the members in the Naval Officers Mess, Vasant Sagar, Mumbai. The formation of Naval Officers Wives Association (NOWA), in 1949 under the leadership of Lady Parry, was therefore a natural evolutionary process. A constitution was drafted and the Association got off to a start at Delhi, Bombay, Cochin, Visakhapatnam and Jamnagar.

Navy Wives Welfare Association (NWWA)
The Association continued to grow and evolve ever since with increasing involvement and influence over issues of community needs. Many of the loan schemes prevalent in service today can be traced back to NOWA. The first family clinics opened as NOWA Clinics. KG schools have been NOWA/NWWA 'babies', as are today’s play schools ‘Little Angels’. Plans for the care of the Navy widows and challenged children have all sprung from sensitive and caring women. In the year 1985, Mrs Meera Tahiliani, the then President, took the initiative and set in motion, events which led to the change over from NOWA to Navy Wives Welfare Association (NWWA). The evolution from NOWA to NWWA marked a significant stage in the process of democratization of the Association. Sailors' wives were integrated with equal rights of membership.

New Organization – a metamorphosis
The new organization consequently began to exert its own pressures leading to better appreciation of community needs. This led to the second major development, which was initiated in 1991, by Mrs Lalita Ramdas, when the organization became truly professional with multifaceted welfare and development programmes. The new organization of the Association has now been in place for many years meeting community needs directly through its programmes and projecting larger issues to the Navy for necessary action as an authentic opinion survey agency. Mrs Binu Shekhawat, who took over from Mrs Ramdas, provided the needed steadying hand consolidating the rapid progress. She worked tirelessly to democratize NWWA in spirit removing rank consciousness. During her stewardship the Regions (Commands) were given greater autonomy and NWWA Units were set free to devise their own programmes to suit local needs within the extensive NWWA charter. In 2000, Northern Region was merged with NWWA Central and the post of President-in-Chief was renamed as President NWWA. President NWWA (NR) was made the Vice-President, NWWA.

The NWWA Logo


The new NWWA Logo exemplifies the strength of unity which is the fulcrum that nurtures harmonious co-existence of Naval Ladies through selfless service to the Naval community. The changing face of modern society necessitates reaching out to all and forging strong bonds within this big Naval family. The four symbolic ladies representing each region are seen emerging from the ocean, holding hands in unison ever so strong and victorious, against all odds. The waves depict sea-going nature of their husband's job and challenges it brings along. The anchor depicts the stability which a Naval wife provides to her better half and keeps him rooted at all times. The anchor has a ' W ' entwined in it, depicting “Women” and all the associated virtues of women in being the wind beneath the wings of their husbands. The phrase 'Reaching out' … adages the much needed rallying point for the society today. We need to foster the spirit of reaching out – to your neighbor, to your community, to the Navy and finally, to your country. The new logo has the colors Red, Orange, Blue and White incorporated to symbolize the tributes of Strength, vision, valour, courage, trust and peace.

NWWA Mission


“Great Oaks from acorns grow”, aptly describes the growth of Navy Wives Welfare Association (NWWA), from an informal group of ladies to what it is today. While the men in white brave the high seas, soar through the skies or prowl the dark, silent depths of the ocean, their families are assured of support and care from NWWA. Being a voluntary organization NWWA follows an ‘open door’ policy for active participation by members, at any stage, in any of its programmes.

Its activities include:
• Women Empowerment
• Community Support
• Education
• Health
• Social Welfare
• Environment

AIMS


•   Keeping wives of all navy personnel in touch for their mutual help and benefit
•   Carrying on developmental programmes in times of peace
•   Providing comfort and all possible help in times of war
•   Rehabilitating widows and families of deceased navy personnel
•   Facilitating development of academic and vocational skills
•   Implementing programmes for community development
•   Relieving hardships of people affected by natural disasters

NWWA unstintingly works towards achieving visualized objectives. This organization is constantly changing its programmes, keeping in mind the growing needs of the community and changing concepts of welfare. NWWA aims to empower all its members not only with professional prowess but also financial independence and entrepreneurial skills to initiate new ventures or get suitable employment. NWWA provides a platform to ladies to “learn and earn” through its various hobby and professional classes.

ORG STRUCTURE

Mrs.Reena Lanba
PRESIDENT NWWA
presidentnwwa.1@gmail.com
Mrs.Geetha Ashok
VICE PRESIDENT NWWA
vicepresidentnwwa@gmail.com
Mrs Preeti Luthra
PRESIDENT NWWA
Western Region
presidentnwwa.wr@gmail.com
OUTLYING UNITS
BANGALORE
GOA
JABALPUR
KARANJA
KARWAR
MANKHURD
OKHA
PORBANDAR
GHATKOPAR
Mrs Meena Pawar
OFFICIATING PRESIDENT NWWA
Eastern Region
presidentnwwa.er@gmail.com OUTLYING UNITS
CHENNAI
HYDERABAD
KALINGA
KALPAKKAM
KATTABOMMAN
KOLKATA
RAJALI
PURUNDU
Mrs Sapana Chawla
PRESIDENT NWWA
Southern Region
presidentnwwa.sr@gmail.com OUTLYING UNITS
AGRANI
CHILKA
DRONACHARYA
EZHIMALA
MANDOVI
SHIVAJI
VALSURA
HAMLA
Mrs Seema Verma
PRESIDENT NWWA
A   &   N Region
presidentnwwa.an@gmail.com